Ribblesdale Medical Practice

Research Studies

Research Study 1:

EXHALE-2

Severe eosinophilic asthma is a type of asthma driven by high levels of a type of white blood cell called eosinophils. If you have high levels of eosinophils in your blood it can cause the airways to become inflamed, leading to asthma symptoms and severe asthma attacks.

The company is conducting a study called EXHALE-2. This study is testing whether adding a new drug called dexpramipexole on top of inhaled medications improves the lung function a person with eosinophilic asthma has compared to a placebo over 52 weeks.

The purpose of these studies is to understand more about the safety of Dexpramipexole and how well it works for the treatment of severe eosinophilic asthma.

In the past few years, a few new drugs that lower eosinophils were approved by the regulators in the UK, US and Europe for the treatment of asthma (for example, mepolizumab/Nuvance; reslizumab/Cinqair; benralizumab/Fasenra). All of these approved drugs are injected using a needle and are prescribed only in hospitals in the UK.

Dexpramipexole is an experimental drug, which is not approved by the US, UK or European regulators.

Dexpramipexole works by lowering the number of eosinophils in the blood. In phase 2 studies we have seen that patients who have a lowered eosinophil also experience an improvement in their lung function.

Dexpramipexole comes in a pill and is taken by mouth twice a day. If approved, it is hoped that this drug will be prescribed in primary care in the UK.

This study is limited to people with severe asthma that is not well controlled, who have increased numbers of eosinophils in their blood and who are currently taking combination medication of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) along with a second controller medication such as a Long -Acting Beta-Agonist (LABA) for asthma. The study will look to see if Dexpramipexole improves lung function and if it makes asthma symptoms better.

Your GP has reviewed your coded medical records and thinks you may be eligible to take part in this study. The study team will check whether you are suitable to take part in this clinical study.

To do this we would like to invite you an initial study visit. At this visit the study team will talk to you about the study and take a blood sample to check your level of eosinophils (white blood cell). If your eosinophil count meets study entry criteria, you will be notified to return to the clinic for further visits.

 

Research Study 2:

EXHALE-4

Eosinophilic asthma is a type of asthma driven by high levels of a type of white blood cell called eosinophils. If you have high levels of eosinophils in your blood it can cause the airways to become inflamed, leading to asthma symptoms and severe asthma attacks.

The company is conducting a study called EXHALE-4. This study is testing whether adding a new drug called Dexpramipexole on top of inhaled medications improves the lung function a person with eosinophilic asthma has compared to a placebo over 24 weeks.

The purpose of these studies is to understand more about the safety of Dexpramipexole and how well it works for the treatment of eosinophilic asthma.

In the past few years, a few new drugs that lower eosinophils were approved by the in the UK, US and Europe for the treatment of asthma (for example, mepolizumab/Nuvance; reslizumab/Cinqair; benralizumab/Fasenra). All of these approved drugs are injected using a needle and are prescribed only by hospitals in the UK.

Dexpramipexole is an experimental drug, which is not approved by the US, UK or European regulators.

Dexpramipexole works by lowering the number of eosinophils in the blood. In phase 2 studies we have seen that patients who have a lowered eosinophil also experience an improvement in their lung function.

Dexpramipexole comes in a pill and is taken by mouth twice a day. If approved, it is hoped that this drug will be prescribed in primary care in the UK. This study is limited to people with asthma that is not well controlled and who have increased numbers of eosinophils in their blood, who are currently taking combination medication of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) along with a second controller medication such as a Long-Acting Beta-Agonist (LABA) for asthma. The study will look to see if Dexpramipexole improves lung function and if it makes asthma symptoms better.

Your GP has reviewed your coded medical records and thinks you may be eligible to take part in this study. The study team will check whether you are suitable to take part in this clinical study.

To do this we would like to invite you an initial study visit. At this visit the study team will talk to you about the study and take a blood sample to check your level of eosinophils (white blood cell). If your eosinophil count meets study entry criteria, you will be notified to return to the clinic for further visits.